Mango

Thai Fruit


Thai name: Ma-muang
Season: March to June

Those who know mangos only from the varieties found in places like Hawaii, Mexico or the West Indies may think they have discovered a new fruit in the light-colored, delicately flavored mangos that turn up on Thai markets between March and June. More than a dozen different kinds are grown, many of them hybrids developed in Thailand. They have become so popular among mango connoisseurs in neighboring countries that nearly 3 million kilograms (6.6 million lbs) are exported annually. Thais eat mangos in a number of ways, depending on the variety. Some types are traditionally served at the peak of ripeness, accompanied by a mound of glutinous rice topped with sweetened coconut milk; the light yellow ok rong and the slightly darker nam dok mai are especially good in this way. Other kinds, such as kiao sa woei are more often eaten as a condiment or in salads when the skin is still dark green and the flesh is white. Mangos are also pickled (ma-muang dong), soaked in sugar water (ma-muang chae im) salted and dried (ma-muang khem), or turned into jams and chutneys.

Average temperatures are consistent year-round. Average highs range from 29°C (84°F) to 33°C (91°F); average lows range from 23°C (73°F) to 26°C (79°F).